The Home of Steven Barnes
Author, Teacher, Screenwriter


Tuesday, March 02, 2010

Has Wellness Become A Luxury Good?


If the actual information about how to best eat, exercise, and think/feel to optimize health and performance were taught in grade school, this would be a different, healthier world. Most of the changes do NOT require large amounts of time and money--but they might require thinking differently.

1) Take five "power breathing" breaks a day, sixty seconds of focused time for deep, slow, exhalations.

2) Strapped for cash? The "warrior diet" approach suggests eating all your daily calories in a window between 5 and 7 in the evening. Hmmm. I know some decent salad bars that provide complete nutrition that are open during that "window." For about the price of a single minimum-wage hour, then, it is possible to eat quite well. Takes discipline, but you can do it.

3) Strapped for time? The Five Tibetans yoga routine can be performed in ten minutes, and requires no equipment and little room or training. Consistency is the key.

4) Fight like hell to create one hour a day that belongs to you. In that time, you can accomplish huge things. But if you don't have an hour, five minutes of stress busting can help you see your life and options more clearly.



www.diamondhour.com

www.realherosjourney.com
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

2 comments:

Richard Sackville said...

The contents of that post are so simple and yet so great.

Regards

Richard

Pagan Topologist said...

Steve, I suspect that wellness has almost always been a luxury good, unfortunately. I don't know whether it is possible to get reliable demographic data, and I am not going to spend time trying right now, but I will "predict" that over the last few thousand years, upper class wealthy folks had longer life expectancies than lower class poor people.